Automotive Technology

CampusStart DateTuition/Fees
Saint JohnSeptember 2020 (Year 1 is offered in Saint John and the second year of the program is offered in Moncton) Domestic | International
MonctonSeptember 2020 Domestic | International

Program Overview

Automotive Technicians know how to keep fuel efficient, clean running, high performing vehicles on the road. Through a blend of classroom and practical work, you'll learn how to diagnose, service, and repair complex components using mechanical skills and electronic diagnostic equipment. This apprenticeable trade will prepare you well for contemporary computerized shops. With options for further study or work experience, your road ahead is wide open.


Duration

The requirements for this diploma program may be achieved within two academic years of full-time study.

Students can exit at the end of year one and obtain Automotive Service Technician certification.


 


Admission Requirements

    Profile A

  • High School Diploma or Adult High School Diploma or GED Diploma of High School Equivalency or Essential Skills Achievement Pathway College Entry High School Diploma

    (NB Francophone High School Math Equivalencies)


    Career Possibilities

    As a graduate of this program you may be employed in private or dealer automotive repair shops, trade-related fields such as distributors of automobile parts, specialty repair shops or warranty specialists for manufacturers. Automotive Technicians are employed by service facilities, car and truck dealerships and by large organizations that own fleet vehicles. Experienced Automotive Technicians may advance to service manager or shop foreman. Some Automotive Technicians open their own repair facilities.

    Find career possibilities related to this program in Career Coach


    Program Courses

    Courses are subject to change.

    The purpose of this course is to refresh skills in mathematics developed through secondary programs in areas deemed essential for the successful completion of the program. Although the topics covered in this course are common to any math program, every effort is made to illustrate their usage in the trades’ professions.

    This course introduces students to proper applications of basic electrical and electronic principles and to proper handling and usage of batteries.

    Prerequisites:

    • SECU1002F
    • SECU1221F

    It is essential in an automotive shop to install and repair electrical and electronic components safely. Building upon the basic principles in Electrical and Electronic Systems I, this course introduces students to more complex electrical and electronic systems.

    Electrical and Electronic Systems II focuses on diagnosing, removing, and installing electrical and electronic components. Students work on components within starting, charging, ignition, and wiper systems. This course also explores the relationships between various systems and students apply that knowledge during diagnosis of the problem.

    Prerequisites:

    • MESE1049B

    This course provides an introduction to the meaning of community service.  Students learn how community service can enhance a student’s educational experience, personal growth, employability, and civic responsibility. Students participate in one day of volunteering to enhance their understanding of civic responsibility and to help the New Brunswick Community College realize its vision of transforming lives and communities. 

    In this course, students focus on applying communication skills in reading, writing, speaking, document use, and critical thinking to make occupation-specific communication effective and efficient while developing computer-related skills necessary to be successful in college and on the job.
     
     

    In this course, students focus on acquiring job search skills to gain a work-term placement as well as employment while also, developing interpersonal communication skills needed to grow their career.
     

    Customer service skills are essential for success in the automotive service industry. Creating a customer service culture is more than serving someone at the customer service desk. It involves building a company culture where the company’s efforts focus on the customer and team members agree upon and care about the customer service values of the company. 

    In this course, students learn how impressions and actions are vital to gaining and retaining customers. It provides insight into customers’ opinions and the influence of corporate values on customer service. Students explore a variety of topics related to customer service including service writing, oral and telephone techniques, listening skills, and customer prioritization.

    This is a 1-day environmental awareness training course based on Environment Canada's "Environmental Code of Practice for the Elimination of Fluorocarbon Emissions from Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Systems, 2014". It is suitable for residential, commercial, industrial, domestic, automotive and mobile applications. Specific topics covered are: CFCs and the ozone layer, isolation valving, recommended components, leak detection methods, system charging procedures, special maintenance provisions, and refrigerant recovery, reuse, recycle and reclamation equipment.

    Prerequisites:

      With an effective approach to sales and marketing, an automotive shop can optimize its profitability. It takes a team that uses effective sales and marketing practices to create an environment where sales increase.

      This course focuses on sales and marketing techniques for various team members in an automotive shop. Automotive Sales and Marketing introduces the factors that influence customers’ purchasing habits and the effect of customer relationships on sales. Students learn how to encourage people to purchase the services and products they need on a proactive basis. The effect of social media and technology on sales and marketing is also explored.

      This course instructs students on the proper use of hand tools and shop equipment. They are also introduced to the proper use of fasteners, tubing and fittings. Motor Vehicle Body Repairer and Painter students also learn the safe use of hydraulic body jacks.

      Prerequisites:

      • SECU1221F

      A safe and healthy workplace is the responsibility of the employer and the employee. This course introduces students to the importance of working safely and addresses how employers and employees can control the hazards and risks associated with the workplace. Students will also learn about the roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders including WorkSafeNB, the employer and the employee in ensuring workplaces are safe.

      This course will introduce students to proper service and repair procedures for brake systems and components.

      Prerequisites:

      • SECU1002F
      • SECU1221F

      This course trains students to correctly repair and maintain suspension systems, their components, and chassis basics.

      Prerequisites:

      • SECU1002F
      • SECU1221F

      This course introduces students to manual and power steering systems and components. Students learn to disassemble, assemble, test, diagnose, repair and maintain steering gear and linkages.

      Prerequisites:

      • VMMV1129I
      • SECU1002F

      The purpose of the practicum is to provide students with a direct, supervised practical experience. Such an experience enables students to apply the knowledge acquired during their training directly to their field of study. The practicum exposes the students to the trade environment and participants are expected to become members of the team in the industry site to which they are attached.

      Students learn procedures for pre-delivery and provincial motor vehicle inspections. Additionally, students learn to diagnose and repair body components and trim.

      Prerequisites:

      • SECU1221F

      This course is designed to provide students with the fundamental skills required to diagnose, service, and repair engine support systems.

      Prerequisites:

      • SECU1002F
      • SECU1221F

      This course is designed to provide students with the fundamental skills required to diagnose, service, and repair drivelines and final drives.
       

      Prerequisites:

      • SECU1002F
      • SECU1221F

      This course introduces students to vehicle components, service information systems, vehicle lubrication procedures, and vehicle start, move, and park procedures. Vehicle Servicing also explores the proper service and maintenance of wheels and tires.

      Prerequisites:

      • SECU1221F

      A proper functioning engine is vital to an automobile. Preventive maintenance and immediate repairs ensure the longevity of an engine. Without proper care, automotive repairs end up costing more as the engine and associated systems fall into such disrepair and wear that replacement is required. Whether providing maintenance, repairs, or complete replacements, it is essential that technicians are skilled in engine systems’ theory and repair procedures.

      Engine Repair builds upon the basic engine theory and engine support systems introduced in Engine Fundamentals. This course focuses on the diagnosing and repairing internal combustion engines using engine-operating principles. Students explore various engine problems, engine lubricants, oil pumps, and oil coolers.  

      Prerequisites:

      • VMMV1211E

      Electronically-controlled steering systems’ benefits include improved fuel mileage over hydraulic systems and the reduction of environmental impacts due to the elimination of hydraulic power steering fluid. These types of steering systems are increasing steadily in the industry and technicians need to become knowledgeable in this area.

      Steering Systems II: Electronically-Controlled focuses on students testing, repairing, and maintaining steering gear and linkage systems for electronically-controlled steering systems. This course examines types of electronically-controlled steering systems, types of variable-assist steering systems, and their relationships to other systems. 

      Prerequisites:

      • VMMV1130F

      Electronically-controlled suspension systems provide a smoother ride and react to a variety of conditions better than conventional suspension systems. As technology advances, it is advantageous for an automotive technician to educate themselves on current suspension systems and be aware of any new systems in development.

      This course focuses on students servicing and maintaining electronically-controlled suspension systems and their components. Suspension Systems II: Electronically-Controlled examines various types of these suspension systems and explores suspension geometry. Students will inspect and diagnose issues related to electronically-controlled suspension systems and ultimately repair or replace components within the system.

      Prerequisites:

      • VMMV1129I

      A fuel delivery system allows a vehicle to store and supply fuel to the engine. For the purposes of this course, the focus is on gasoline fuel delivery.

      This course explores gasoline fuel delivery systems, injections systems, intake systems, and exhaust systems. Gasoline Delivery, Intake, and Exhaust Systems examines relationships between systems and components, common problems associated with the systems, and how to safely work on the systems. Students learn to diagnose and repair gasoline fuel delivery, intake, and exhaust systems using proper procedures.

      Prerequisites:

      • SECU1221F
      • SECU1002F

      Automotive manual transmissions have fallen out of favorability with the Canadian population over time. It is now common to find people who cannot drive a vehicle with a manual transmission. However, an automotive technician will continue to see manual transmissions in their shop. There are car enthusiasts who still appreciate the feel and control of a manual. In addition, older vehicles are still on the road and people still buy baseline car models with manual transmissions for economic reasons.

      This course focuses on servicing and repairing manual transmissions, clutches, and final drives. Students examine types of manual transmissions, engine and driveline mounts, clutches, flywheels, mechanical and hydraulic clutch actuating systems, and final drives. There are explorations of various power flows including those of the manual transmissions, clutch systems, and final drives. Manual Transmissions, Clutches, and Final Drives covers safety practices and the appropriate procedures for diagnosing, removing, and installing components associated with the particular systems.

      Prerequisites:

      • VMMV1212F

      In Canada, automatic transmissions are the most popular in the market and therefore technicians will work on them more frequently than manual transmissions. Automatic transmissions also require more specialized work than manual transmissions due to the complexity of the components.

      This course focuses on servicing and repairing automatic transmissions. Students examine types of automatic transmissions, continuously variable transmissions, and gear designs. There is an exploration of the automatic transmission’s power flow and a review of hydraulic principles in relation to it. Automatic Transmissions also provides the opportunity to use and interpret electric and hydraulic schematics related to transmissions. Students become knowledgeable of the signs and symbols on the warning and indicator systems associated with transmission issues and work with a variety of tools to diagnose and repair identified issues.

      Prerequisites:

      • VMMV1212F

      Transfer cases are components that allocate power from the transmission to the front and rear axles. They are controlled either manually by a selector switch or automatically through the electronic system. Technicians must be able to identify problems related to transfer cases through road tests, fluid checks, and inspection. 

      This course focuses on the diagnosis and repair of transfer cases. Students examine types of transfer cases, All Wheel Drive (AWD) systems, control systems, and related systems, including their operations and relationships. Transfer Cases also explores the power flow of a transfer case.

      Prerequisites:

      • VMMV1212F

      Vehicle networking systems allow modules within the vehicle to interconnect and share information. Electronics have rapidly grown within vehicle components and most components have electronic features. With the steady increase and innovations in computerized systems and components, it is important for an automotive service technician to have the knowledge and skills to work on these types of systems.

      Vehicle Networking Systems examines the various networking protocols, networking of modules and multiplexing, and interpretation of related data. Students focus on diagnosing and repairing vehicle networking systems and On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) systems and components using proper procedures.

      Anti-lock brakes provide the ability for a driver to retain steering control during situations requiring emergency braking. It has become a requirement on new vehicles to increase safety for drivers. Other safety systems related to vehicle braking include traction control, stability control, and adaptive cruise control. Each system provides an automated response for increased vehicle safety and drivability. As braking and control technology expands, it is important for technicians to have the knowledge to work with these systems.

      Braking Systems II: Anti-Lock Braking focuses on diagnosing and repairing anti-lock braking and control systems. This course examines the various types of anti-lock braking systems, hybrid and electric vehicle braking systems, and control systems. Students explore trailer brakes and controls as well as their operation. There is also an emphasis on the appropriate practices for working with these systems safely.

      Prerequisites:

      • VMMV1127H

      Diesel fuel systems have existed for many years and are more likely to be present in larger vehicles than smaller ones. With ongoing developments to reduce environmental impacts, vehicles with hybrid and electric fuel systems are entering automotive service shops with increasing frequency.

      Diesel, Hybrid, and Electric Fuel Systems examines types of fuel delivery and injection systems, including their components and operations. Students learn to diagnose and repair diesel, hybrid, and electric fuel systems safely using appropriate tools and procedures.

      Prerequisites:

      • VMMV1226B

      This comprehensive project-based course provides students the opportunity to continue to hone their knowledge base and professional skills in the automotive shop facility. Students work, both collaboratively and independently, on troubleshooting and repairing vehicle systems and components.

      A successful automotive shop requires informed processes and organization. Tracking and analyzing records or information often leads to discoveries on shop improvements. Also, understanding how a specific automotive team (e.g. front counter, technicians, manager) functions together can lead to changes in the flow of the incoming and outgoing work.

      Automotive Service Business Fundamentals focuses on the essential business skills required in an automotive shop. Students explore how to record and use labour tracking data to improve processes. By examining successful shop setups and practices, students begin to learn when and how to apply them based on data. This course also emphasizes the necessity of various roles in the shop and the importance of building positive relationships amongst staff and management.

      This course teaches students how to properly perform oxy-fuel and metal inert gas (MIG) welding.

      Prerequisites:


        NOC Codes

        7321 - Automotive service technicians, truck and bus mechanics and mechanical repairers
        7535 - Other automotive mechanical installers and servicers
        9522 - Motor vehicle assemblers, inspectors and testers


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