Mechanical Engineering Technology

CampusStart DateTuition/Fees
Saint JohnSeptember 2022 (Blended Delivery) Domestic | International

Program Overview

Keep the wheels in motion. The Mechanical Engineering Technology program trains you to provide technical support and services in the design, development, maintenance and testing of machines, components, tools, heating and ventilation systems. In your first year, you'll learn the basics of mechanical engineering technology. In your second year, you'll learn advanced machine design, computer-aided drawings and specifications, building systems including HVAC, and engineering manufacturing operations and processes.


Duration

The requirements for this diploma program may be achieved within two years of full-time study.


Admission Requirements

    Profile I

  • High School Diploma or Adult High School Diploma or GED Diploma of High School Equivalency or Essential Skills Achievement Pathway: Post-Secondary Entry High School Diploma
    • Pre-calculus 110
      or
      Geometry and Applications in Mathematics 112 and Functions and Relations 112
      • Total of two (2) sciences, including at least one (1) from the following:
        • Biology 112 or 122
        • Chemistry 112 or 122
        • Physics 112 or 122

      NB Francophone High School Math Equivalencies
      International Student Admission Equivalencies


      Career Possibilities

      Graduates of this program can work in technical and industrial areas including mechanical and machinery maintenance and operations, manufacturing, processing, inspection, mechanical design, engineering sales and research and development.

      Find career possibilities related to this program in Career Coach.


      Specific Considerations

      Mechanical engineering technologists need the following qualities:
      • the capability to visualize 3-D objects
      • the ability to detail a project from two-dimensional drawings
      • the ability to perform with defined detail and within narrow tolerances
      • good analytical skills
      • good sketching and drawing skills
      • the ability to solve mechanical problems by applying of theories
      • conduct tests with a methodical approach
      • good mathematical skills
      • effective communication skills
      • capable of working independently or as part of a team when required

      Local campuses can provide information on courses that are the prerequisites for technology programs at NBCC. Many universities give credits for courses completed in this program, however, assessment is normally completed on an individual basis.

      Students accepted into this program may be eligible for financial awards offered through the J.D. Irving Limited Training Incentives Program.

      NBCC is a connected learning environment. All programs require a minimum specification, including access to the internet and a laptop. Your computer should meet your program technology requirements to ensure the software required for your program operates effectively. You can review these computer specifications here (under your program specifications). Free wifi is provided on all campuses.
       


      Program Courses

      Courses are subject to change.



      Prerequisites:

      • PHYS1130A
      • MATH1272A

      In this course, students learn the components and methods of delivering water-related mechanical services within a building. Discussed in this course are water supply, fire protection, wastewater, and stormwater systems. Throughout this course, reference is made to relevant industry standards and building codes. A parallel course teaches CAD techniques for drawing piping systems for buildings. Learning is achieved through lectures, in-class activities, and project work.

      Prerequisites:

      • FLUI1060A
      • SAAL1838B

      While introducing the fundamentals of maintaining a comfortable building environment, students will also study the properties of air and develop methods to calculate heating and cooling loads: lectures and in-class activities aid optimal learning.

      Prerequisites:

      • PHYS1135A

      This course is designed to teach students how to specify and design HVAC systems. The course culminates in a project to analyze the heating and cooling loads of a building and design an HVAC system to fit the need. Throughout the course, reference is made to relevant industry standards and codes. Air and hydronic systems are both considered. Learning is achieved through lectures, in-class activities, and a major project.

      Prerequisites:

      • BSSI1054A

      This course is designed for students to learn various thermodynamic cycles that are used to extract mechanical energy from heat including Rankine, Otto, and Diesel cycles. Learning is achieved through lectures and in-class activities. 

      Prerequisites:

      • PHYS1135A



      Prerequisites:

      • SAAL1838B

      This course is designed to help students strengthen their fundamental skills in writing clear, effective sentences and paragraphs, and enable them to create organized, unified and coherent documents. The writing process is introduced. Students will recognize the importance of writing for the intended purpose and audience.

      This course introduces students to the fundamentals of technical writing and research. Students will learn how to write a variety of technical documents and business correspondence suitable to a specific audience and purpose as well as learn how to conduct research and document sources.

      Prerequisites:

      • COMM1264A

      This course introduces the fundamentals of engineering technical report and proposal writing. Topics include technical report and proposal design, formatting, visual aids, and specific types of content required for technical report and proposal writing.

      In this course, students will apply their previously acquired writing skills and writing process (prewriting, writing and revising). They will learn how to properly research, plan, structure and write technical reports and proposals using proper layouts, form, and formats. Learning is achieved through lectures and hands-on activities.

      Prerequisites:

      • COMM1267C

      This course is designed for students to learn how to quickly make sketches and notes. Emphasis is on recognizing the important details and getting them clearly sketched and/or written down. Accuracy, neatness, and legibility are stressed throughout.  

      Learning is achieved through hands-on class activities and assignments. 

      This course introduces students to ethical principles and codes of conduct applicable to Professional Engineering Technology practice. It prepares students for being engineering technology professionals by exploring critical thinking, ethical behavior, and the legal and professional accountabilities that apply in the workplace. The industry's code(s) of ethics and practical case studies are used as the learning focus.

      Learning is achieved through lectures, case studies, and team projects.

      This course is the first phase of the capstone project. It provides students with an opportunity to work independently on a selected engineering project. Students will integrate the knowledge and skills they learned in the program to develop a project proposal and complete details of a project plan.

      In this course, students will select an engineering project on a topic, prepare a project proposal, and submit it for instructor approval. Upon instructor approval, students will research, design, and develop a project plan that outlines the specifications and tasks to be completed in time and within the budget for the proposed project. Students are expected to produce some deliverables and project management documents based on the project plan to facilitate the second phase of the capstone project. Learning is achieved through lectures and guided independent study under the guidance of a project advisor.

      Prerequisites:

      • PROJ1099B
      • COMM1268B

      This course is a continuation of the Capstone project. Students will evaluate their project proposed and developed in the previous course. They will complete their project work and prepare and present the final project report. Learning is achieved through lecture and guided independent study under the guidance of a project advisor.

      Prerequisites:

      • ETTG1034B

      This course introduces students to basic concepts and methods of fluid mechanics. It aims to establish a strong foundation and understanding of basic fluid mechanics. Topics include hydrostatics and hydrodynamics. Both SI and USCS units are used throughout.  

      Students will learn how to apply the principles of fluid mechanics in the analysis and solution of engineering problems. Learning is achieved through lectures and in-class activities and assignments. 

      Prerequisites:

      • MATH1272A
      • PHYS1132A

      This course is designed for students to gain practical lab experience in fluid flow and measurements of fluid forces, pressures and flow rates. Learning is achieved through practical laboratory experiments.

      Prerequisites:

      • FLUI1058B

      This course is designed for students to apply the principles of hydrostatics and hydrodynamics to the analysis and design of basic fluid flow systems. Topics include series and parallel pipe systems, pump types and selection, and minor line losses. Learning is achieved through lectures and in-class activities.

      Prerequisites:

      • FLUI1058B



      Prerequisites:

      • BEEB1191A

      This course is designed to equip students with fundamental knowledge of the structure, properties, processing, and performance of engineering materials used in manufacturing metal objects. Emphasis is placed on the properties of metallic materials and how those properties can be changed through various processing methods. Students will be able to apply what they have learned to the selection of appropriate materials and processing methods for the design and manufacturing of metal objects.

      Learning will be achieved through lectures and class activities.

      Prerequisites:

      • PHYS1132A

      This course introduces students to the fundamentals of material testing methods and procedures. Students learn how mechanical properties of metals are tested and determined through the application of ASTM (American Society for the Testing of Materials) Standards.

      Learning is achieved through performing ASTM standard tests in a laboratory setting.

      Prerequisites:

      • MATE1096A



      Prerequisites:

      • PHYS1132A



      Prerequisites:

      • MPMI1103B

      This course forms the foundations of technical mathematics. Topics covered include fundamental numerical calculations, manipulation of algebraic expressions, and solving equations, system of equations, and word problems. Learning is achieved through lectures, classroom examples and working out problems.

      This course is designed for students to learn more advanced algebra, trigonometry, and geometry. Topics include quadratic equations, trigonometry, logarithms, and vectors.

      Learning will be achieved through lectures and classroom examples and work. Learning is achieved through lectures and in-class activities.

      Prerequisites:

      • MATH1271A

      This course introduces students to advanced technical math required to solve applied problems in Engineering Technology. Topics include complex numbers, matrices, plane analytic geometry, graphs of trigonometric functions and trigonometric equations. Limits, as required for calculus, is also introduced. 
       
      Students will be able to apply the advanced technical math to solve technical problems and evaluate limits. Learning is achieved through lectures and in-class activities.

      Prerequisites:

      • MATH1272A

      This course introduces students to calculus with derivatives and integration of algebraic functions. Applications include equations of tangents and normal, Newton’s method for solving equations, curvilinear motion, related rates, and areas under curves. Learning is achieved through lectures and in-class activities.

      Prerequisites:

      • MATH1273A



      Prerequisites:

      • MATH1274A



      Prerequisites:

      • MATH1275A

      This course is designed to introduce students to the process of turning CAD modeled designs into actual parts using computer-controlled manufacturing technologies. The basics of milling are covered prior to learning how to use CAM software to turn models into CNC code. Learning is achieved through lectures and in-class activities, and also through practical experience in a machine shop.

      Prerequisites:

      • TOFO1016B
      • SAAL1839A

      This course provides students with a general knowledge of the many processes used by industry to manufacture goods for sale. The topics include drilling, tapping, sawing, grinding, turning, and milling.

      Prerequisites:

      • TOFO1016B

      This course provides students with “hands-on” experience of the many processes used by industry to manufacture goods for sale. The topics include drilling, tapping, sawing, grinding, turning, and milling.

      Prerequisites:

      • TOFO1016B
      • MNFT1059B

      This course introduces students to engineering mechanics in static systems. Topics include static equilibrium, structural members, centroids, and moments of inertia. Students learn basic concepts and skills that form the foundation for structural and mechanical design. They will develop the ability to understand and analyze static forces on various structures and engineering applications. Learning is achieved through lectures and in-class activities.

      Prerequisites:

      • PHYS1132A
      • MATH1273A

      This course is designed to teach students how the components of our machines and built environment respond to applied forces. Topics include deformation, deflection, and safe design requirements for columns and pressure vessels. Learning is achieved through lectures and in-class activities.

      Prerequisites:

      • MPMI1102A
      • MATE1096A

      This course is designed to teach students how our machines respond to dynamically applied forces. Topics include combined stresses, failure theory, mechanical fastening, mechanical drive systems, linear and rotational motion elements. Learning is achieved through lectures and in-class activities.

      Prerequisites:

      • MPMI1103B

      This course provides an introduction to the meaning of community service.  Students learn how community service can enhance a student’s educational experience, personal growth, employability, and civic responsibility. Students participate in one day of volunteering to enhance their understanding of civic responsibility and to help the New Brunswick Community College realize its vision of transforming lives and communities.

      This workshop introduces students to the process of finding employment. It explores the various strategies and resources available, and examines the role of social media.

      This course introduces students to the principles of energy and matter. Emphasis is on basic concepts of how energy interacts with matter. Students also learn practical techniques for solving problems relating to energy and matter. 

      Learning will be achieved through lectures, class activities and assignments. 

      Prerequisites:

      • MATH1271A

      This course is designed for students to gain practical experience ​in data collection, analysis, problem solving, and experimentation related to energy and matter. Students learn to take measurements and practice working with different units of measure as they analyse data and solve problems. Learning is achieved through performing experiments in a lab setting and writing lab reports.

      Prerequisites:

      • PHYS1130A

      This course introduces students to the principles of Newtonian physics. The focus is on forces acting on bodies in one and two dimensions. Rotational motion is also discussed.  

      Learning will be achieved through lectures, class activities and assignments.

      Prerequisites:

      • MATH1272A
      • PHYS1130A

      This course is designed for students to gain practical experience observing and analysing objects with forces acting on them. Students apply the principles of Newtonian physics to take measurements, analyse collected data and solve problems. Learning is achieved through performing experiments and analysing results in a lab setting.

      Prerequisites:

      • PHYS1132A

      This course introduces students to the basic vapour-compression refrigeration cycle. Topics include the vapour-compression cycle, refrigerants, refrigeration components, heat exchanger design, and the arrangement and operation of heat pumps. Students will gain an understanding of the basic refrigeration cycle as used in HVAC systems. Learning is achieved through lectures and in-class activities.

      Prerequisites:

      • FLUI1058B

      This course provides students with basic principles, tools, and techniques of engineering project management. Students will learn how to manage an engineering project from its initiation phase, through planning, execution, control, and closeout.
       
      As part of the course, students will apply the knowledge gained to create a project management plan for a simulated engineering project in a team effort or on an individual basis. Learning is achieved through lectures and hands-on class activities.



      Prerequisites:

      • STAT1034A

      This course introduces students to basic computer applications and tools that are integral to all engineering disciplines, including word processing, presentation, spreadsheet, and electronic file management and data sharing.

      Students learn how to select and use appropriate computer applications to perform tasks such as research, data analysis, data presentation and sharing, and preparation of technical documents and reports within their discipline. An emphasis is placed on the data security, and safe use and management of files in a collaborative networked environment. Learning is achieved through practical application of skills during hands-on class activities and assignments.

      This course introduces students to the CAD (Computer-Aided Design) tools that are integral to all engineering disciplines for making and annotating basic engineering drawings. Students will learn the application interface, options, and commands for producing basic engineering drawings. Learning is achieved through practical, hands-on activities while using the CAD software.

      This course is a continuation of Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools required to prepare and produce drawings for various mechanical components. Emphasis is on producing multi-view drawings.

      Learning is achieved through practical, hands-on activities while using CAD software.

      Prerequisites:

      • SAAL1836A

      This course introduces students to BIM (Building Information Modelling) software and its application to the modelling of building mechanical systems. Building components and how they interact and integrate with one another will be discussed. Students learn how to insert the mechanical system components of a building into an existing building model. Emphasis is placed on producing drawings of building mechanical systems. Learning is achieved through practical, hands-on activities while using the BIM software.

      Prerequisites:

      • SAAL1836A

      This course introduces students to the elements of solid modelling, creation of parts of increasing complexity and the assembly of parts to form a final design. Students will learn how to use current CAD (Computer-Aided Design) software to produce three-dimensional drawings for manufacturing applications.

      Students learn to model parts and assemblies in 3D using modelling software. Part of the course involves a design project to create a model of a complex mechanical device. Learning is achieved through hands-on application of the modelling software.

      Prerequisites:

      • DRDE1081A



      Prerequisites:

      • SAAL1837B

      This course is designed to teach students how to use solid modelling software to simulate and analyze mechanical components before they are manufactured. Topics include simulating motion and determining stress and deflection under load. Learning is achieved through hands-on use of the modelling software.

      Prerequisites:

      • SAAL1839A

      A safe and healthy workplace is the responsibility of the employer and the employee. This course introduces students to the importance of working safely and addresses how employers and employees can control the hazards and risks associated with the workplace. Students will also learn about the roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders including WorkSafeNB, the employer and the employee in ensuring workplaces are safe.



      Prerequisites:

      • MATH1273A

      This course is designed to provide a foundation in metrology as applied to metal-working manufacturing. Topics include geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T) as per ASME Y14.5M-1994. Learning is achieved through lectures, in-class activities, and labs/demonstrations.

      Prerequisites:

      • MATE1096A

      This course introduces students to the fundamentals of effective, successful presentations. Students learn how to prepare and deliver online or in-person presentations of various lengths and purposes. They will discover how to prepare presentations around essential objectives, present key concepts and ideas, design and make effective visuals using presentation software, and apply techniques for polishing and mastering presentation delivery.

      As part of the learning, students will apply the appropriate tools and techniques to prepare the content, create visual aids using presentation software, and deliver one or more presentations to their peers in class.

      In this course, students experience how to use welding equipment and perform basic welding and cutting practices, while examining the variables involved.

      Prerequisites:

      • MATE1096A


      NOC Codes

      2232 - Mechanical engineering technologists and technicians


      External Certifications

      Mechanical Engineering Technology graduates may have an opportunity to acquire the following external certifications upon meeting the external agencies certification requirements and paying any required fees to the external agency:

      Institution: NBSCETT - New Brunswick Society of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists
      External Certification: Mechanical Engineering Technology
      Information: Certification by the New Brunswick Society of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists (NBSCETT) with two years of acceptable work experience.


      Disclaimer: This web copy provides guidance to prospective students, applicants, current students, faculty and staff. Although advice is readily available on request, the responsibility for program selection ultimately rests with the student. Programs, admission requirements and other related information is subject to change.


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